How to Become an Appraiser.

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Learn more about how to become an appraiser

3 Steps to becoming an appraiser.

SO you want to learn more about how to become an appraiser? We're here to show you! There are 3 main parts in getting there. Each step requires different amounts of education, training, and time. To see a higher-level view of everything involved, check out these tutorials we've put together below which explains the whole process soup to nuts. Don't be intimidated, though, we'll walk you through the first step below. Read on.

How to become an appraiser - Trainee How to become an appraiser - Licensed Appraiser How to become an appraiser - Certified Residential Appraiser How to become an appraiser - Certified General Appraiser
Learn more about how to become an appraiser

How to get started...

The first step in becoming an appraiser is to earn the "trainee status". It’s worth noting here that some states call it different things – apprentice, limited appraiser, etc – but that is largely semantics. In any case, there are 2 pieces to becoming an appraisal trainee:

1. Course Requirements

While the process of how to become an appraiser may differ a little bit from state to state, in general, apprasial trainees need 75 hours of education. There are no exams or previous experience required; these courses will give you the knowledge you need to start down the path of becoming an appraiser. These 75 hours of education are often collectively called pre-licensing education or qualifying education. In most states, you can take them online so you can learn at your own pace.



2. Training With a Mentor

Even with the appraisal classes under your belt, you are not permitted to independently perform appraisal assignments without a supervisor. Therefore, that leads us to the trickier part: finding a supervisor to train you and to sign off on your work. The best advice is to network through friends and family to find a willing appraiser to mentor you.



You will need 2000 hours with your supervisor over a period of not less than one year, so choose wisely. Working with a supervisory appraiser gives you the opportunity to gain experience and grow your understanding of the appraisal process. Plus, as your knowledge and experience grow, so will your earning power as many supervisors compensate you for your level of contribution to each appraisal assignment.

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Now you know how to become an appraiser. What's next?

Get started on becoming an appraisal trainee! Select your state to view your classes...

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